Inside the bizarre cult run by Australia's strongest man

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    pimwilfred

    The virtual get together came about in celebration of Maryland couple Susan and John’s Zoom wedding, hosted by the newly ordained Krasinski. John proposed to Susan by recreating Jim’s bent knee to Pam outside a petrol station in The Office.

    The other cases are consistently intriguing too. Hairdresser Patrice Endres disappeared from her salon in 2004, and her body was found nearly two years later. Alonzo Brooks was last seen at a party in rural Kansas, also in 2004, and his body was found nearby a month later. Young mother Lena Chapin went missing in 2006, shortly after she implicated her own mom in the murder of the mom’s ex-husband. In Unsolved Mysteries, families are not always like the Waltons.

    Compared to its more glamorous sister sports – Crossfit, yoga, bodybuilding and strongman – powerlifting remains on the fringes of mainstream athletics and generally attracts a more colourful range of competitors.

    Before the rowdy wedding festivities, Krasinski’s wife Emily Blunt had a go at opening the show doing her best Krasinski impression, American accent and all, but lasted less than a minute before Krasinski kicked her out of his presenter’s seat.

    A powerlifting champion who was once accused of seducing a vulnerable 17-year-old girl has turned over a new leaf as a satanic ‘cult leader’ and porn star who advocates animal welfare and mental health support at his thriving Central Coast gym.

    Keane describes himself as the ‘cult leader’ at Pale Horse Powerlifting on the New South Wales Central Coast, where he charges upwards of $200 per month for customised training plans and online coaching

    Kudos, too, to the show for paying homage to its past in a classy way that doesn’t feel like a desperate nostalgia grab. A photo of longtime host Robert Stack, who died in 2003, floats like a benevolent ghost through the opening credits, and the memorable and spine-chilling theme music is updated but still recognizable.

    That’s why I was wary of Netflix’s reboot of true-crime show Unsolved Mysteries, which I loved back in the day. Sometimes fond TV memories are best left in the past, you know? I for one did NOT need a Melrose Place remake with Ashlee Simpson, not that anyone asked me. 

    Producer Terry Dunn Meurer told USA Today viewers started sending in tips on the various cases within 24 hours of Netflix premiering the new show, specifically about the Brooks, Rivera and Chapin cases. Brooks’ case was even reopened by police in June, Dunn Meurer told Variety. And Redditors have come up with a variety of theories about the  murdered French family, a truly haunting episode that put me in mind of 1971’s infamous family killer John List, who was eventually caught thanks to another TV show, America’s Most Wanted.

    To take the homage to the next level, Krasinski brought Jenna Fischer in as maid of honor (10:10), along with “some of my family.” After he married the couple, the cast of the Office then showed up to dance to Forever by Chris Brown.

    We’d all love to surprise Mom with the car of her dreams, right? In this time of coronavirus woes, though, we don’t really see too many folks — even those flush with cash — dropping big coin to earn brownie points with their parents. So consider this list to be something of a daydream catalog, or better yet, a set of vehicles that your matriarch might consider choosing from when it does come time for her to replace her ride.

    The beautiful story that is John Krasinski’s Some Good News YouTube show has come full circle. Like the positive news show’s inaugural episode, episode 7 brought us another The Office reunion, this time featuring absolutely everyone — from Steve Carell to Jenna Fischer to Mindy Kaling.

    But I’m here to say the Unsolved Mysteries reboot sucked me in from the first minute. While I hesitate to say it’s better than the Robert Stack original, it’s that rare remake that uses all the improvements made in television since its first run to evolve into a fresh, modern and fascinating version of its old self. The interviews are longer and more in-depth. The re-enactments are judiciously used and aren’t cheesy. The cases are well-chosen and get plenty of time. If you found yourself sucked into the podcast Serial, you’ve found your summer TV obsession.

    2 Days. “Mystery on the Rooftop” is the story of a beloved Baltimore man, his suspicious death, and a family searching for answers. What happened to Rey Rivera? #unsolvedmysteries #suspicious pic.twitter.com/1wXpyMWsm7

    Only episode 5 felt out of place. Like Unsolved Mysteries occasionally did in the old days, this episode wanders into the world of aliens and the paranormal, focusing on a 1969 UFO. It’s the oldest case in the new batch, and definitely the least consequential. I made myself watch the entire episode to be fair to the show, but by the end, I still didn’t care about what may or may not have happened in Massachusetts 50 years ago. But I should expect more off-the-wall episodes — executive producer Terry Dunn Meurer told Variety a ghost story is among the upcoming shows.

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